Perfect Humans

Table-Tipping — Is There Any Truth To It?







There's one type of psychic phenomena that has always intrigued me and that is Table-Tipping also known as Table-Turning. Maybe because it is so physical. It works on the same principles as the Ouija Board, not ghosts or evil spirits like most people believe but the collective works of all the human minds participating in the tipping. Where everyone who is participating, creates enough energy intent on a single purpose. Table-Tipping was a very popular parlour game during the early 1900's.





Like the Ouija Board, you can ask it questions and it will answer with knocks, raps and tilts.


When actually witnessing a Table-Tipping session, a person is left believing the phenomena was caused by a ghost or other entity. You can't help it, the performance can be quite dramatic, depending on the participants. So, you could imagine what people thought in those early years, for sure it must be ghosts or some sort of demonic entity, as in this video...






Try it yourself. Gather four or five people. Make sure they can attend all the sessions needed because sometimes it takes more than once. Select a quiet place where you will hold these sessions and not be interrupted. Make it comfortable for everyone participating. 


Pre-pick your table. Don't use the heavy oak dining room table, or you'll be waiting all night. It ain't going to happen! A small foldout card table would be perfect. Perform the session in almost darkness.





All of you sit around the table, relax and try not to think of the table moving, hold hands showing them on top of the table at all times, finger tips only touching the table, no matter what, your hands must stay on the top of the table, talk and ask questions in a normal voice and see what happens. Don't be surprised if it doesn't work the first time, and don't give up. It will work eventually, guaranteed.


The phenomena of Table-Tipping was debunked by a 19th century scientist named Michael Faraday. He devised a table to prove his theory, that the table had nothing to do with the tipping, it was everyone's fingers doing the tipping not the other way around. Interest in the phenomena declined almost over night, now it's almost unheard of but now you know.


That doesn't mean there isn't something mysterious or spiritual about the practice of Table-Tipping. A table that moves on it's own? It's eerie, and people will swear on the Bible that they are not moving the table. Why it moves is still really unexplained. 


It doesn't matter why the people are moving it, it's how, which is more important? With reports of tables to have risen right up off the floor and suspend itself for several minutes, seemingly using it's own power, under the disbelief of witnesses.






It's got to be some sort of mysterious energy, wouldn't you think? The collective works of all the participants involved doing the touching. Energy from another dimension released from the tips of our fingers? 


Who knows? It could be your long lost uncle doing the Table-Tipping. Nothing has been proven. It's still up in the air, so to speak.


What do you think?






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2 comments:

Kym-n-Mark Todd said...

Great article, DB. We read the movement of a Quija Board's planchette might be explained by the ideomotor effect, but the levitation of "table tipping" seems less likely for this explanation. Electrostatic? Hm. Since you're from Canada, you're doubtless familiar with the 1972 "Philip Experiment," which also produced table-tipping in spades -- and for a group of skeptical researchers calling upon a fictitious entity. There's some principle at work here, but beyond our current understanding of the properties. Again, great article. Thx 4 sharing!

Kym-n-Mark Todd said...

Great article, DB. We read the movement of a Quija Board's planchette might be explained by the ideomotor effect, but the levitation of "table tipping" seems less likely for this explanation. Electrostatic? Hm. Since you're from Canada, you're doubtless familiar with the 1972 "Philip Experiment," which also produced table-tipping in spades -- and for a group of skeptical researchers calling upon a fictitious entity. There's some principle at work here, but beyond our current understanding of the properties. Again, great article. Thx 4 sharing!

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